Ohio University Office of Career Services


Career Fair brings over 100 employers to OU by Tyler
October 3, 2011, 1:45 pm
Filed under: Career Resources, Events | Tags: , , ,

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The Art of the Last Minute Job Search by Christy R

The Art of the Last Minute Job Search

Did your time at OU fly by? Are you scrambling to find a job that’s right for you? Come learn about last minute job search techniques, including a quick résumé revamp, how to market your education, and who to help you get a leg up on the competition!

As part of Senior Week 2011, Career Services invites you to attend this free workshop tomorrow, Tuesday, May 24th @ 5pm, Baker 503.

Hope to see you there!



You made it through college, now help someone else do it too! by Christy R

You made it through college now help someone else do it too!

I Know I Can is looking for graduating seniors from all backgrounds interested in advising seniors in high school and helping them make it to post-secondary education.  I Know I Can is a non-profit in Columbus, Ohio that works in Columbus City Schools promoting and helping students realize their potential to achieve their dreams of going to college.  I Know I Can hosts positions with AmeriCorps that will be open next year.  Representatives from I Know I Can will be on campus this Friday, May 20!  There will be table on the first floor of Baker Center from 11AM-1PM with lots of info and an information session from 5PM-6PM in Baker 233.  Come out and see what AmeriCorps and I Know I Can have to offer you.



Networking & Hiring Event for All Majors on OU Campus by Christy R

Networking & Hiring Event for
All Majors on OU Campus:

4th Annual BioVenture & Innovation Showcase

An exciting opportunity for all majors is happening next week right here on the OU campus! The 4th Annual BioVenture & Innovation Showcase will take place next Tuesday, May 24th, from 10am-5pm in Walter Rotunda.

Why You Should Attend

  • Professional Development and Learning Sessions
  • Networking Lunch (lunch and snacks provided with registration)
  • Speed Mentoring: structured time to ask questions and discussion with key individuals
  • Potential for HIRE!

Manta Media recently announced massive hiring phase and also has a student intern program. Manta Media’s CEP, Pam Springer is a key note speaker— great opportunity to mix and mingle! They have hired OU grads in the past and there are a wide variety of possible
permanent and internship opportunities, including:

  • Web Developers, application developers, mobile developers
  • Interns with stats/analytics backgrounds to be applied towards analyzing and potentially optimizing some of their many web initiatives or ad campaigns
  • Data mining and analytics
  • IT and Desktop support
  • Online marketing interns (emarketing)
  • Marketing communication or advertising interns
  • User Experience, web design or creative production

Register Here to Attend the Event (Free).

Interested in attending this event, but have questions about networking & interacting with potential employers? Stop by the Office of Career Services for a walk-in appointment with one of our career counselors.




Interview Bloopers & How to Avoid Them by Christy R

Interview Bloopers & How to Avoid Them

The ability to write a great résumé or cover letter may help you land an interview, but that’s not all it takes to get the job. An outstanding résumé can get you in to meet with your potential employer but once you’re sitting across from them in the interview you will have to start over in order to prove that you are the best candidate.

Most interview bloopers occur because of the lack of practice and preparation. Of course even if you are well prepared, the interview may not go perfectly–we all make mistakes. However, the following mistakes can easily be avoided by developing strong interviewing skills and preparing properly for the interview.

Weak communication skills.
Non-verbal communication plays a crucial role throughout the interview. A poor handshake may weaken your chances of getting hired from the very beginning. Also remember to make eye contact, avoid fidgeting and looking at your watch. Be aware of your body language–it may not be obvious to you but the interviewer will easily notice it.

Poor verbal communication skills will almost certainly decrease your chances of getting hired. Giving a long, rambling answer to a simple question demonstrates an inability to concentrate and process relevant information. Avoid using any slang–stay professional no matter what. Listening skills are also vital: don’t spend so much time thinking about your answer that you’re not paying attention to the question.

Failing to research the company.
Be prepared to demonstrate an awareness of the company and the position for which you are applying. It’s going to be obvious that you did not do your research if you ask the interviewer to tell you more about the position or what the company does. Read the job description. Check out the company website. Know the organization. On the other hand, don’t go overboard with your knowledge. When you know something about the company, wait for the right moment to share it. Do not interrupt the interviewer to tell them you already know the information. Wait until they have finished and then add a comment to what they just shared.

Dressing inappropriately.
When in doubt, err on the side of too formal. It is unlikely that there will be a good reason to show up for the interview casually dressed. Every company has its own dress policy, and it is a good practice to dress one level above what is acceptable for company.

Being late or too early.
Never be late. Develop a habit of being on time. It’s also important not to turn up too early because it creates the impression of having too much time on your hands and being desperate for the job. Five to ten minutes early is a good rule of thumb.

Being negative.
It’s important to have the right attitude during an interview. Never complain about your current job and stay enthusiastic throughout the interview. Be careful to treat everyone you meet with courtesy, including the receptionist. Many companies watch to see how you treat their staff. It gives them an indication of how well you might fit in to the company.

Asking inappropriate questions.
At the end of the interview always take the opportunity to ask questions. By paying attention during the interview, you will ensure that you don’t ask about something that was already discussed. Take some time before the interview to think about the position, what it involves and what kind of information you need to know to learn more about it. Have several questions prepared before you go into the interview. Avoid asking questions about salary and benefits during the initial interview. These are only appropriate once you have been offered the job.

Failing to follow up.
Be persistent. Send an email and thank you note after the interview, thanking the interviewer for their time. By following up and letting the employer know that you are still interested, you will increase your chances of getting a job.

Remember, preparation and practice are key. The Office of Career Services provides you with assistance when preparing for an interview. You can find general information about interviews on our website.

The Mock Interview Program can also help you sharpen your interviewing skills. Visit our website for more information.

Make sure to check out our On Demand Presentations for additional information on Behavioral Interviews or Phone Interviews.

Get ready and the best of luck on your interview!

—Written by Anna Morlang, CareerCATS Coordinator for the Office of Career Services

References
Quintessential Careers
The Time of India
Career Alley



Dressing the Part: What Your Work Wardrobe Says About You by Christy R

Dressing the Part: What Your
Work Wardrobe Says About You

Dressing properly for work assures credibility and helps to develop a professional relationship with colleagues and clients. Today many companies have adopted business casual attire and let go of some of the more conservative ways of dressing. Problems arise because the concept of business casual is not clearly defined and depends on the company’s dress policy and its corporate culture. Since few companies adopt clear written guidelines regarding business casual attire it is really important to learn the company culture and understand the expectations.

In the traditional business environment, for example, the existing culture expects you to stick to the classical business suit. It is crucial to establish reliability and a good reputation when you work in professions such as banking, finance or accounting. Choose a simple pattern or dark colors and try to change your professional business attire a single item at a time. Think of your dress as something that speaks for you and the way you do business. If the environment you work in is physically demanding, the internal culture there allows you to go with comfortable and easy-to-clean attire, but make sure that your clothes look smart and fit well. When interviewing with a company whose dress code or corporate culture you are not really familiar with, a business professional, traditional suit will be the perfect choice. Once you get hired and learn what the expectations and internal rules are you can adjust your style accordingly.

While it is important to know and understand your specific company’s environment, there are some basic rules that work for any situation or work environment.

Don’t get too casual. The fact that your company has a business casual dress code does not mean that you can get away with inappropriate outfits. Remember where you are and that you represent the company you work for. People won’t take you seriously if you can’t take the time to dress appropriately for the situation. Do a simple “Friday night” test: if you would pick a specific item to wear out to a weekend party, it probably doesn’t belong in the office.

Be professional in your choice of clothing. A short skirt is not a good choice for women to wear in the office environment. Short socks that expose legs are taboo for men. Avoid using bright colors in your outfit; it does not usually look professional. An option here would be adding an accessory that is an unusual color and goes along with the rest of the attire; however, that should be as far as it goes.  The foundational rule for wearing jewelry in a business environment is not to overdo it.

Summer Business Dress. Remember not to abandon your regular business attire when it gets warm outside. Sleeveless tops are very tempting in the summer time, but are usually not appropriate for a business situation. If you do happen to wear one, be sure that you have a jacket to put on when the situation requires. Women can try putting up their hair to stay cool and look sophisticated at the same time.

The Bottom Line. Every time you choose what to wear, think about the message that you want to send with your appearance. Keep in mind that you represent yourself and your organization. Carefully built credibility and reputation can be damaged very quickly by an inappropriate choice of clothing. By following some basic rules and learning the corporate culture of the company will guarantee you a professional look!

For more valuable information on professional dress, view our handout on Dressing Professionally in our Handout Library.

—Written by Anna Morlang, CareerCATS Coordinator for the Office of Career Services

Sources:
www.theworkbuzz.com
www.fashionforrealwomen.com
www.westsidetoastmasters.com



Career Resource Spotlight: Career Opportunities in the Publishing Industry by Christy R

Career Resource Spotlight:
Career Opportunities in the
Publishing Industry

Have you ever wondered what your options are if you are interested in pursuing a career in the publishing industry? This book breaks it wide open! First of all, it breaks job opportunities down into three main sub-fields:

  1. Newspaper Publishing
  2. Magazine Publishing
  3. Book Publishing

From there, it goes on to list all the different jobs you could possibly think of. Here’s a quick list to give you an idea of the range of careers possible:

For newspaper: Editor, Writer, Page Designer, Marketing Director, Publisher.

For magazine: Editor, Fact Checker, Freelance Writer, Art Director, Public Relations Director, Business Manager.

For book: Proofreader, Book Packager, Children’s Author, Book Designer, Sales Representative, Bookseller, Publishing Attorney.

…and many more!

For all of these, a specific job profile is listed, including duties, typical salaries, best geographical locations, and employment prospects, making this an indispensable resource for those of you considering this field for a living!

All this information is at your fingertips! Take advantage of it simply by visiting our resource library in the Office of Career Services‘ Career Resource Center.