Ohio University Office of Career Services


Networking & Hiring Event for All Majors on OU Campus by Christy R

Networking & Hiring Event for
All Majors on OU Campus:

4th Annual BioVenture & Innovation Showcase

An exciting opportunity for all majors is happening next week right here on the OU campus! The 4th Annual BioVenture & Innovation Showcase will take place next Tuesday, May 24th, from 10am-5pm in Walter Rotunda.

Why You Should Attend

  • Professional Development and Learning Sessions
  • Networking Lunch (lunch and snacks provided with registration)
  • Speed Mentoring: structured time to ask questions and discussion with key individuals
  • Potential for HIRE!

Manta Media recently announced massive hiring phase and also has a student intern program. Manta Media’s CEP, Pam Springer is a key note speaker— great opportunity to mix and mingle! They have hired OU grads in the past and there are a wide variety of possible
permanent and internship opportunities, including:

  • Web Developers, application developers, mobile developers
  • Interns with stats/analytics backgrounds to be applied towards analyzing and potentially optimizing some of their many web initiatives or ad campaigns
  • Data mining and analytics
  • IT and Desktop support
  • Online marketing interns (emarketing)
  • Marketing communication or advertising interns
  • User Experience, web design or creative production

Register Here to Attend the Event (Free).

Interested in attending this event, but have questions about networking & interacting with potential employers? Stop by the Office of Career Services for a walk-in appointment with one of our career counselors.


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Interview Bloopers & How to Avoid Them by Christy R

Interview Bloopers & How to Avoid Them

The ability to write a great résumé or cover letter may help you land an interview, but that’s not all it takes to get the job. An outstanding résumé can get you in to meet with your potential employer but once you’re sitting across from them in the interview you will have to start over in order to prove that you are the best candidate.

Most interview bloopers occur because of the lack of practice and preparation. Of course even if you are well prepared, the interview may not go perfectly–we all make mistakes. However, the following mistakes can easily be avoided by developing strong interviewing skills and preparing properly for the interview.

Weak communication skills.
Non-verbal communication plays a crucial role throughout the interview. A poor handshake may weaken your chances of getting hired from the very beginning. Also remember to make eye contact, avoid fidgeting and looking at your watch. Be aware of your body language–it may not be obvious to you but the interviewer will easily notice it.

Poor verbal communication skills will almost certainly decrease your chances of getting hired. Giving a long, rambling answer to a simple question demonstrates an inability to concentrate and process relevant information. Avoid using any slang–stay professional no matter what. Listening skills are also vital: don’t spend so much time thinking about your answer that you’re not paying attention to the question.

Failing to research the company.
Be prepared to demonstrate an awareness of the company and the position for which you are applying. It’s going to be obvious that you did not do your research if you ask the interviewer to tell you more about the position or what the company does. Read the job description. Check out the company website. Know the organization. On the other hand, don’t go overboard with your knowledge. When you know something about the company, wait for the right moment to share it. Do not interrupt the interviewer to tell them you already know the information. Wait until they have finished and then add a comment to what they just shared.

Dressing inappropriately.
When in doubt, err on the side of too formal. It is unlikely that there will be a good reason to show up for the interview casually dressed. Every company has its own dress policy, and it is a good practice to dress one level above what is acceptable for company.

Being late or too early.
Never be late. Develop a habit of being on time. It’s also important not to turn up too early because it creates the impression of having too much time on your hands and being desperate for the job. Five to ten minutes early is a good rule of thumb.

Being negative.
It’s important to have the right attitude during an interview. Never complain about your current job and stay enthusiastic throughout the interview. Be careful to treat everyone you meet with courtesy, including the receptionist. Many companies watch to see how you treat their staff. It gives them an indication of how well you might fit in to the company.

Asking inappropriate questions.
At the end of the interview always take the opportunity to ask questions. By paying attention during the interview, you will ensure that you don’t ask about something that was already discussed. Take some time before the interview to think about the position, what it involves and what kind of information you need to know to learn more about it. Have several questions prepared before you go into the interview. Avoid asking questions about salary and benefits during the initial interview. These are only appropriate once you have been offered the job.

Failing to follow up.
Be persistent. Send an email and thank you note after the interview, thanking the interviewer for their time. By following up and letting the employer know that you are still interested, you will increase your chances of getting a job.

Remember, preparation and practice are key. The Office of Career Services provides you with assistance when preparing for an interview. You can find general information about interviews on our website.

The Mock Interview Program can also help you sharpen your interviewing skills. Visit our website for more information.

Make sure to check out our On Demand Presentations for additional information on Behavioral Interviews or Phone Interviews.

Get ready and the best of luck on your interview!

—Written by Anna Morlang, CareerCATS Coordinator for the Office of Career Services

References
Quintessential Careers
The Time of India
Career Alley



Be Smart. Be Civil. Be Safe. BE EMPLOYED! by erinnunn

Be Smart.
Be Civil.
Be Safe.
BE EMPLOYED!

Though spring weather has not quite arrived, Spring Quarter in Athens sure has. With the first fest weekend now behind us and many more upcoming, it’s important to think about partying smart. The new campaign launched this quarter encourages students to do just that— Be Smart. Be Civil. Be Safe— reminding students that inappropriate party behavior stays on every social media and internet site.

We talk a lot to students about creating a professional online presence, such as getting connected on LinkedIn and keeping status updates and tweets professional. So if statistics about last year’s fest arrests and suspensions don’t get you to think twice about partying smart, civil, and safely, consider how it will affect your job and internship prospects in an already tight market. An employer will think twice about hiring a student whose first link on a Google search is an article discussing their pending court case due to rioting, a picture dancing around a couch fire, or a quote about partying strong since 8 am.

Be Smart. Be Civil. Be Safe. It just makes a whole lot more sense.

—Written by Erin Nunn, Office of Career Services Interim Assistant Director



2011 Job Outlook: Good News for Class of 2011! by Christy R

2011 Job Outlook:
Good News for Class of 2011!

Based on information provided by the National Association of Colleges and Employers (NACE) Job Outlook Fall 2011, employers are planning on hiring 13.5% more graduates in 2011 than they did in 2010. In addition to hiring more graduates, NACE has reported the hiring outlook for 2011 to be “good,” in contrast to last year’s rating of “fair.”

What do these statistics mean for you as a soon-to-be-graduate? They mean that you need to work on your GPA, and focus on your leadership skills when reaching out to employers in order to attain your true potential as a future employee. As discussed throughout NACE’s statistics, employers are working to cut many applications off if applicants GPAs do not fall above a 3.0. Additionally, to best present your credentials, be sure to successfully convey your strong communication skills, work ethic, teamwork, analytical skills, and overall initiative when pursuing any position with a company.

While the employment statistics for 2011 college graduates are high, proper attention needs to be paid to make sure you are able to put your best foot forward as a job applicant. By incorporating all discussed factors, your pathway to landing a career post-graduation will inevitably be secured, assisting in your overall growth as a future business leader.

—Contributed by Haley Drometer, Practicum Student for the Office of Career Services

The Office of Career Services is here to help you in your career pursuits and help you develop valuable careers skills. To make an appointment with a career counselor or to pick up copies of our handouts, stop by our office or visit our Handout Library online.



Tips for the Job-Seeker by Christy R

Tips for the Job Seeker

Is it time to leave college behind and transition into the real world? Are you bored with your current job and want to change careers? Read on, job search advice is coming your way! There are many ways to go about finding a job that is perfect for you.

Explore your options
First, you need to decide which factors are important to you when seeking a job. Think about the field you would like to work in, hours you want to work, the environment that’s right for you, and whether the job is in line with your values. Decide if you are willing to relocate for the job, and if it is important to you whether you can move up in the company.

Get an Internship
If you find a profession that you are interested in, you may decide to explore what it would be like to work in the field. Consider trying an internship to acquire experience in your area of interest. This is a great way to determine whether a certain career path is right for you. Additionally, an internship is an outstanding résumé booster that will show employers that you have some related experience.

Do Your Research
Once you decide on an occupation that suits you, you’re ready to begin your journey toward finding a specific place of employment. This is when the real hunt begins.

To start, you may want to use online resources to research and find openings for the types of jobs you’re looking for. Look on our Job Search Resources page on the Career Services website to identify job posting websites in specific fields that may interest you. There you can find an assortment of postings by field or type, including seasonal/summer, teaching abroad, multicultural, nonprofit, and green jobs.

Ohio University students may also take advantage of Bobcat CareerLink to view postings online for jobs targeted specifically to OU students and alumni.

Networking
Don’t stop at perusing through job postings online, though. Take your job search one step further by networking. Both face-to-face and social media networking are effective job search strategies. Consider trying out Bobcat Mentor Network, which can put you in contact with alumni from Ohio University that are willing to help you decide which career path is best for you. Some can even help you find an internship or a job.

You can also use social media such as LinkedIn to connect with professionals in your network and beyond. Reaching out to people you already know can help you connect with others in the field or recommend other job search strategies to you.

Career Fairs are also a great way to network. You can meet individuals in the company you wish to work for, or get a feel for the types of organizations you wish to look into further.

Contact the employer
Once you decide which organization sounds like a good match, you need to contact the employer to find out if there are job openings and whether you can interview for a position. Find an email address or a phone number and contact the individual in charge of hiring. Mention that you’re interested in the company and that you would like to schedule an interview if they have an opening.

Prepare for the interview
If you land the interview, make sure your résumé is up to date and tailored toward the specific job you are applying for. Then, you should find references that can attest for your work ethic and motivation. References should be professional and can include professors, advisors, supervisors, or anyone that can comment on your potential for the new job. Once you’ve got your résumé in hand and your references ready, you need to prepare for your interview. Develop an elevator pitch, which is a brief overview about yourself regarding your background, education, relevant experiences, and why you want to work for their specific company. Also make sure to do your research on the company and prepare questions to ask at the end of the interview.

Ace the Interview
Show up a few minutes early to your interview and be professional and courteous to all individuals you meet on the way into the interview. Remember to BREATHE! You’ve done your preparation, and now it’s time to show them why you would be a good fit with their organization.

Be proactive about your job search. It can be a full-time job trying to find a full-time job, so start your search now!

For further information regarding our career resources, visit the Career Services website, or schedule an appointment to meet with one of our Career Advisors.

—Contributed by Kelli Swackhamer, Office of Career Services Practicum Student



Brush Up on Your Career Fair Etiquette by Christy R

Brush Up on Your Career Fair Etiquette

As we gear up for the annual OU Winter Career Fair tomorrow, here are a few helpful reminders to help you interact successfully with employers.

BEFORE THE FAIR

1. Identify & research employers: Visit Bobcat Career Link to find out what employers are registered for the fair. Do some initial research about the companies by visiting their websites.

2. Bring multiple copies of your résumé…and don’t forget to organize them neatly in a nice portfolio.

3. Practice your introduction: Be ready to introduce yourself to employers and highlight your major, class status, and how your knowledge/skills would be an asset to the company.

4. Dress professionally: Dark business suits and ties for men, with polished shoes, dark socks, and well groomed hair. Neutral or dark suits work best for women, with panty hose, close-toed, low-heeled shoes, and minimal make-up/perfume.

DURING THE FAIR

1. Make a good first impression: Greet the employer with a firm handshake and smile, and introduce yourself.

2. Demonstrate your knowledge: Let the employer know that you’ve done your research and are able to communicate how you will fit into the company.

3. Remember names and companies: Be sure to get the recruiters name and business card.

AFTER THE FAIR

1. Follow up: Send a thank you note to the employers you spoke to. Reiterate the main points you discussed with them at the fair e.g. your qualifications, interest, and anything you forgot to mention at the event. Be sure to send a résumé/make a phone call if the employer asked you to do so.

—The information above was taken from the Office of Career Services’ “Career Fair Etiquette” flier which is available for students to pick up at any time. For other helpful handouts on a variety of career-related topics, stop by our office or visit our Handout Library online.



Professionalism In the Workplace for New College Grads by Christy R

Professionalism in the Workplace for New College Grads


New college grads need to start putting workplace professionalism higher on their list of priorities as they seek jobs, employers say, according to a recent poll conducted by York College of Pennsylvania’s Center for Professional Excellence. The 2010 Professionalism in the Workplace Poll discovered eight specific areas in which employers have found new grads lacking:

  • Accepting personal responsibility for decisions and actions.
  • Being open to criticism.
  • Displaying a sense of ethics.
  • Being competent in verbal and written communication.
  • Taking initiative.
  • Projecting a professional image.
  • Thinking independently.
  • Demonstrating passion for their work.

The first two traits (accepting personal responsibility and being open to criticism) are the ones listed as needing the most improvement. Information Technology etiquette is another area in which employers are noticing less-than-desirable habits. The growing trend among students to surf the internet, text message, and respond to cell phone calls during class is translating into the work world in ways that employers find unprofessional.

Professionalism in the workplace is not limited to corporate jobs or specific professions (business, healthcare, law, etc.). In answer to the question, “Are all positions considered capable of exhibiting professionalism?” the majority of respondents indicated that they think of professionalism “as being related to the person rather than the position. Anyone in any position has the potential to exhibit professional traits and behavior.”

As you seek to project a professional image, keep in mind the following traits which were mentioned most often as characteristics of the professional employee:

  • Personal interaction skills (includes courtesy and respect).
  • Ability to communicate (includes listening skills).
  • Work ethic (includes being motivated and working on a task until complete).
  • Personal appearance.
  • Self-confidence and self-awareness.