Ohio University Office of Career Services


Résumé Words Not to Use by Christy R

Résumé Words Not to Use

When browsing a résumé, recruiters often look for specific words that are relevant to the job description. When writing a resume, you should aim to make it stand out. A couple of simple rules will help you to avoid words that are overused and do not add uniqueness to your résumé, as well as words that are not appropriate to put on your résumé.

Never use words that are too general and are irrelevant to a position description.

Remember to be very concrete and provide specific examples about every skill you list on your résumé. Avoid words like responsible or successful. We all have responsibilities that are associated with our jobs, so avoid listing your job duties unless very relevant to the job for which you are applying. Instead, be very specific about your accomplishments. It should be common sense to include only successes on your résumé but just listing them does not provide employers with useful information. Illustrate your success with specific examples and show how the success was measured.

For the same reason, avoid putting problems-solver or skilled on your résumé. These words are too general and need more concrete examples to add value to your résumé.

Avoid using words like assisted, helped or contributed.  When tempted to put assisted down, ask yourself: How exactly did you help/assists? What were the results and how big of a contribution did you manage to add? What amount of work (list specific tasks) did you do?

Avoid using word team-player, describe how you contributed to or lead a team. Never put just excellent written and verbal communication skills—provide an example of how often you had to write and how many viewers you had.

Never use words that are not appropriate for the résumé.

Remember to screen every word that you put on the résumé to make sure they are professional enough to be there. Avoid using over-praising adjectives like splendid or spectacular—they not only do not sound professional but also have no credibility.

Avoid saying how you feel about your job or your job function—words that carry feelings are not relevant to your job function whether you hated it or it was a pleasure. Never include a description of your physical appearance such as attractive unless it is relevant to the job.

You résumé is not the proper place for talking about your political beliefs or your religion—thus avoid words like liberal. It is also not appropriate to mention your health and there is no need to put strong immune system on your résumé.

It is tempting to use familiar with when you are not particularly good at something however still want to mention it on the résumé. You have a choice of learning it well enough to become proficient or leaving it off your résumé. Familiarity means that you know a little but will still need to be trained—just like a person who is not familiar with that same thing.

Avoid highly-intelligent (and rarely used) words. You may just confuse your reader or give the wrong impression. By the same token, avoid jargon or acronyms that are not generally accepted or widely understood. Don’t use clichés and words that are overused and won’t set your résumé apart from the others. Use synonyms to make your résumé stand out.  Never use personal pronouns in your résumé—it is a summary of your experience and “I” or “me” are considered redundant.

By using strong words and avoiding inappropriate words, and by spending good amount of time writing your resume you will be able to add character to it and make it stand out from hundreds of others!

To have a career counselor look over your résumé, come to the Office of Career Services walk-in hours.

—Written by Anna Morlang, CareerCATS Coordinator for the Office of Career Services

References
New Grad Life
SavvySugar: Money
Hub Pages
Online Degrees Today

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Career Resource Spotlight: Military-to-Civilian Career Transition Guide by Christy R

Career Resource Spotlight:
Military-to-Civilian Career
Transition Guide

The Essential Job Search Handbook
for Service Members

Leaving the military might be one of the most difficult transitions you’ll ever make. Significant tim

e and effort must go into getting your civilian life and career off to a good start. This book will guide you through creating a transition strategy and timeline and investigate the continuing military benefits and opportunities available to you.

Taking advantage of this resource will help you:

  • Prepare for what to expect from those around you as you transition from the land of ID cards to one without them.
  • Identify your greatly expanded available military and civilian resources.
  • Clarify your new potential benefits and entitlements as a soon-to-be veteran.
  • Create an overall transition strategy that works.
  • Identify your skills, strengths, weaknesses, and desires so that you can put yourself on the right career track.
  • Write résumés and job search letters that get the attention of employers.
  • Interview successfully for jobs.
  • Effectively evaluate and negotiate job offers.
  • Begin your new job with a clear understanding of the civilian side of things so that your next promotion is right around the corner.

Stop by the Office of Career Services‘ Career Resource Center today to browse our extensive resource library or make an appointment with a career counselor!



Dining Etiquette Workshop by Christy R

Dining Etiquette Workshop

Do you know the dos and taboos of dining etiquette? Are you prepared to interview during a meal?  The Office of Career Services is pleased to welcome Deborah Thomas-Nininger of DTN Productions to Ohio University to facilitate a Dining Etiquette Workshop. This workshop will guide you through proper dining and interviewing techniques as well as providing tips for pre-dinner mingling.

Due to high demand, Career Services has added one more table to the program.  Single tickets are available for $15, first come, first serve.  Please bring a check (written to: Ohio University Career Services) to 533 Baker University Center to receive a ticket.

When: Monday, May 9, 2011

Time: Dinner will begin promptly at 6:00 pm

Where: Baker University Center Ballroom

Cost: $15 (only checks will be accepted)

*Cost includes four course meal and training materials
**Professional business attire required.

Please direct any questions about the Dining Etiquette Workshop to Ali Woodworth at aw800110@ohio.edu.

More on Deborah Thomas-Nininger
Deborah Thomas-Nininger has been conducting business etiquette, communication and self-presentation workshops and training seminars for over 20 years. During that time she’s coordinated the international etiquette training for the 1996 Olympic Games held in Atlanta for Coca-Cola. Deborah has presented to a wide varieties of companies and universities including Nationwide Insurance, Cardinal Health, Bath and Body Works and Harvard University.  For more on Deborah Thomas-Nininger visit her website at http://dtn-productions.com/home .



Information Systems Analyst Training Program by Christy R

A certificate program will be offered to prepare graduates of two- and four-year degree programs for information systems analyst positions.
Brought to you FREE through a partnership with Tri-County Adult Career Center, Career Connections, McGann Consulting, and Ohio Skills Bank.

This intensive three-week program will equip you with the cutting edge skills desired by an international IT company surveying Athens County for a future site opening. This company pays a very competitive wage and provides excellent benefits. Trained analysts are in high demand nationwide with an employment growth rate of 24% over the next 7 years. We strongly encourage qualified applicants to take advantage of this unique opportunity.

ISA Intensive – Information Systems Analyst Training Program
Developed and delivered by university faculty and industry professionals.
When: May 23, 2011 – June 10, 2011
• Schedule: Monday-Friday, four-six hours per day
• Training Location: Tri-County Adult Career Center, Nelsonville, OH
• Space is limited

Participants will be selected based upon qualifications but openings will be filled as submissions come in. Interested applicants are strongly encouraged to apply early. Submissions due: Friday, April 22, 2011.

Requirements for Qualified Applicants
• Commitment to complete an intensive three-week program
• Bachelor’s or associate degree
• Interest in business or information systems
• Excellent analytical and communication skills
• Ability to work in a team environment
• PC, MS Office proficiency

HOW TO APPLY
Email your interest and updated resume to:
analyst@careerconnections.info

Program Will Include:
• System Development Lifecycle
• (SDLC) examination
• Information Systems (IS) fundamentals
• IS design methodology
• IS implementation practices
• IS hard & soft skill development
• Project management techniques

Résumé Should Include:
• Contact information
• Relevant work history
• College education end dates
• GPA

Submissions due: Friday, April 22, 2011



Teach For America: You can help eliminate educational inequity by Christy R

Teach for America: You can help eliminate educational inequity

Calling “individuals from all backgrounds, majors, and professional experiences who have what it takes to excel as teachers and improve the quality of education for children growing up in low-income communities.”

What is educational inequity? Teach for America describes it as “the reality that where a child is born determines the quality of his or her education and life prospects.”

The statistics given speak for themselves:

  • By the time they reach fourth grade, children living in low-income communities are already two to three grades behind their higher-income peers.
  • Just half of students in low-income communities will graduate high school by age 18. Those who do graduate will perform on average at an eighth-grade level.
  • Overall, only 1 in 10 students growing up in poverty will graduate from college.

Teach For America is breaking the cycle of educational inequity by targeting 39 specific urban and rural regions and sending well-trained teachers in to help students perform excellently at high levels. These corps members make a two-year commitment to go above and beyond traditional expectations for teachers, in order to help their students succeed.

So what does this have to do with you? You can become one of these corps members. No matter what your degree, you can use your talents and energy to help provide solid education to otherwise under-privileged children.

Application deadlines are coming up Wednesday, October 27, 2010; December 17, 2010; and February 4, 2011. Pick any deadline to apply for 2011.

For more information on this opportunity and to find out how to apply, visit www.teachforamerica.org.



OU Career Week: September 27-October 5 by Christy R

As we’re gearing up for Career Week starting next Monday, September 27, 2010, here are a few things all Bobcats should know about what’s going on for the week and what great opportunities are available.

Several of the workshops are specifically geared toward getting you ready for our Fall Career Fair on Tuesday, October 5. “Career Fair or Bust” will teach you how to interact with employers. First impressions are always important, and this workshop will coach you into making a strong positive impression and recommend how to best prepare for the fair.

The interview is an all-important part of landing that job, but you don’t need to let your nerves destroy your ability to showcase your value to a potential employer. “Interviewing Essentials” will teach you how to prepare for an interview, answer common interview questions, dress professionally, and project an image of competence and confidence! This training will come in handy on Mock Interview Day when every student will have the chance to put their new knowledge to the test by participating in mock interviews with actual employers. This is a perfect opportunity to practice without the pressure of an actual job on the line.

Next to the interview, a well-written résumé is vital in the job hunt. Everyone has questions about what a well-written résumé should look like. How long is too long? How short is too short? Do I need to list every single thing that I’ve ever done? We’ve made it a little easier for you: Bring your résumé to our “Résumé Blitz”, to have it professionally critiqued. You’ll avoid common résumé mistakes and choose words that will set you apart from the crowd.

For those of you who are still undecided about which career path to choose, the StrengthsQuest workshop will be invaluable. You will learn how to assess your own unique strengths, and use them to guide your career decisions. Once you know what your specific strengths are, you’ll learn how to discuss those strengths to your advantage with employers.

We’ve showcased a few of our workshops here, but for a complete list, visit our website workshop page.

I hope to see you all starting Monday!



From the Classroom to the Workplace by Alyse K

From the Classroom to the Workplace: How to apply your classroom skills in the job market

Besides refining your résumé and earning that college degree, there may be more to consider in order to make yourself more marketable. As you prepare to enter the job market, students are encouraged to look closely to how their experience in college can be beneficial to the job hunt. The article, “Which Classroom Skills Translate To The Job Market?” provides a list to see how your school experiences can become valuable job skills.

  1. Communication skillsCan you effectively share ideas?

    Class presentations and group projects provide an opportunity to develop valuable communication skills that will be helpful when it comes to selling ideas or products, running meetings and more.

  2. Analytical skillsAre you detail oriented?

    Classes promoting analytical skills can help in solving problems and analyzing information. Analytical skills are particularly prized in professions where you are expected to multi-task under pressure.

  3. Teamwork skillsDo you work well with others?
    Although some group projects in school may seem like a waste of time, they can really help you when you enter the professional world. Working well with others is important as almost any level of employment. You can gain skills that help in managing organizations, supervising others and delegating responsibility.

  4. Technical skillsAre you computer savvy?

    Being able to work with complex systems or equipment is an invaluable tool for applicants. Technical skills developed in the classroom can help launch a career in technology or media.

  5. Strong work ethicHave you made special efforts to reach your goals?

    Employers look for applicants that can meet deadlines, stay committed to tasks and handle pressure. Taking online classes or going to night school requires the dedication and time management skills, which come in handy when you have tight deadlines and meetings to attend.

To read more about classroom skills, check out this article and more at Yahoo! Education.